UncategorizedCPA New Jersey Personal Tax Changes you'll want to know about

Standard Deduction

The standard deduction for married filing jointly rises to $12,700 for tax year 2017, up $100 from the prior year.

For single taxpayers and married individuals filing separately, the standard deduction rises to $6,350 in 2017, up from $6,300 in 2016, and for heads of households, the standard deduction will be $9,350 for tax year 2017, up from $9,300 for tax year 2016.

For 2017, the additional standard deduction amount for the aged or the blind is $1,250. The additional standard deduction amount is increased to $1,550 if the individual is also unmarried and not a surviving spouse.

For 2017, the standard deduction for a taxpayer who can be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer cannot exceed the greater of (a) $1,050 or (b) $350 + the dependent’s earned income.

Personal Exemption

The personal exemption for tax year 2017 is $4,050, the same as 2016.  However, the exemption is subject to a phase-out that begins with adjusted gross incomes of $261,500 ($313,800 for married couples filing jointly). It phases out completely at $384,000 ($436,300 for married couples filing jointly.)

Kiddie Tax

The kiddie tax applies to unearned income for children under the age of 19 and college students under the age of 24. For 2017, the threshold for the kiddie tax – meaning the amount of unearned net income that a child can take home without paying any federal income tax – is $1,050. All unearned income in excess of $2,100 is taxed at the parent’s tax rate.

Tax Rate

For tax year 2017, the 39.6 percent tax rate affects single taxpayers whose income exceeds $418,400 ($470,700 for married taxpayers filing jointly), up from $415,050 and $466,950, respectively. The other marginal rates – 10, 15, 25, 28, 33 and 35 percent – and the related income tax thresholds for tax year 2017 are described in the revenue procedure.

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)

For 2017, the maximum EITC amount available is $6, 269 for taxpayers filing jointly who have 3 or more qualifying children. The revenue procedure has a table providing maximum credit amounts for other categories, income thresholds, and phase-outs.

Child & Dependent Care Credit

For 2017, the value used to determine the amount of credit that may be refundable is $3,000 (the credit amount has not changed). Keep in mind that this is the value of the expenses used to determine the credit and not the actual amount of the credit.

Adoption Credit For 2017

The credit allowed for an adoption of a child with special needs is $13,570, and the maximum credit allowed for other adoptions is the amount of qualified adoption expenses up to $13,570. Phase-out’s do apply beginning at taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) in excess of $203,540 and completely phased out for taxpayers with MAGI of $243,540 or more.

Hope Scholarship Credit

The Hope Scholarship Credit for 2017 will remain an amount equal to 100% of qualified tuition and related expenses not in excess of $2,000 plus 25% of those expenses in excess of $2,000 but not in excess of $4,000. That means that the maximum Hope Scholarship Credit allowable for 2017 is $2,500.

Student Loan Interest Deduction

For 2017, the maximum amount that you can take as a deduction for interest paid on student loans remains at $2,500. Phase-out’s apply for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) in excess of $65,000 ($135,000 for joint returns) and is completely phased out for taxpayers with modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) of $80,000 or more ($165,000 or more for joint returns).